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Do Solar Panels Heat Up The Atmosphere? [RESOLVED!]

In addition to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, which disrupt the earth’s energy balance by acting like a blanket around the planet, another contributor to atmospheric warming (and therefore climate change) is the change in albedo of the earth’s surface 😁 Albedo is just a fancy word for reflectivity, and the problem of changing reflectivity is most important in the Arctic 🔥 Arctic sea-ice acts as a huge mirror reflecting the sun back into space 😉 As the sea ice melts, it exposes the Arctic Ocean. This ocean is darker and has a lower albedo. Climate change is not the only reason Arctic sea-ice melts, it’s also contributing to it. [1]
It was shown that the model shows that a solar farm of 20% size will trigger a feedback loop. The heat emitted from the dark solar panels, compared to highly reflective desert soil, creates an extreme temperature difference between the ground and surrounding oceans which eventually lowers the surface. Air pressure and causes Moisture will condense and rise into raindrops. More monsoon rain. Plants grow and the desert reflects less of the sun’s energy, since vegetation absorbs light better than sand and soil. More plants means more water evaporates, which creates a humid environment, which encourages vegetation growth. (Reported by Jeremy Sanchez of Mandalay, Myanmar, April 18, 2021). [2]
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According to analysts, nature.comThe number of large-scale photovoltaic installations (PV) has increased dramatically in the last decade1,2,3. The proliferation of PV powerplants and renewable energy portfolios demonstrates an increasing acceptance of the technology and its cost effectiveness4,5. In parallel with the increase in PV installations, there has been an increased assessment of their impacts, including on how PV can offset energy requirements9,10. A growing concern that remains understudied is whether or not PV installations cause a “heat island” (PVHI) effect that warms surrounding areas, thereby potentially influencing wildlife habitat, ecosystem function in wildlands, and human health and residential property values11. Similar to the Urban Heat Island Effect (UHI), large PV can have a significant impact on home values in residential areas11. Power plants The landscape can be altered to reduce albedo. This will make the landscape darker and more reflective. A decrease in terrestrial albedo (from 20% for natural deserts12 down to 5% above PV panels13 changes the energy balance. This alters absorption and storage as well as the release and emission of short-wave and longwave radiation14-15. There are many differences in the potential PVHI effects and UHI, which make it difficult to compare and lead to competing hypotheses as regards whether large-scale PV installation will cause a heat island effect. These include: (I) PV installations shade a portion of the ground and therefore could reduce heat absorption in surface soils16, (ii) PV panels are thin and have little heat capacity per unit area but PV modules emit thermal radiation both up and down, and this is particularly significant during the day when PV modules are often 20 °C warmer than ambient temperatures, (iii) vegetation is usually removed from PV power plants, reducing the amount of cooling due to transpiration14, (iv) electric power removes energy (v), PV panels absorb and reflect upwelling longwave radio waves from solar power plants. This prevents the soil’s cooling from as great as possible under night sky conditions. Jack Wright (Bournemouth, United Kingdom), December 25, 2021. [3]
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According to the model, if the Sahara has more than 20 percent solar farms in size, it creates a feedback loop. The heat emitted from the dark solar panels, compared to highly reflective desert soil, creates an extreme temperature difference between the ground and the oceans. This eventually lowers the surface pressure. It also causes moisture to rise and condense to form raindrops. With more monsoon rainfall, plants grow and the desert reflects less of the sun’s energy, because vegetation absorbs light better than sand and soil. More plants means more water evaporates, which creates a humid environment, which allows for vegetation to grow. Dereka Jimenez, who pointed this out to us, deserves a big thank you. [4]