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How Were Organic Molecules Formed? [RESOLVED!]

Scientists speculate that RNA was the first organic compound to develop. Scientists believe that the earliest life could have been based only on RNA, and that later DNA and proteins were developed. This theory is known as the RNA World Hypothesis. Why is it called RNA? It can encode genetic instructions (like DNA), and some RNAs can carry out chemical reactions (like proteins) 😎 Therefore, it solves the chicken-and-egg problem of which of these two molecules came first 😁 Another evidence suggests that RNA could be the oldest organic compound. You can learn more about the RNA world hypothesis and the evidence for it at this link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAkgb3yNgqg.
To tackle this question, Museum Gerstner Scholar Victor Sojo and Reuben Hudson from the College of the Atlantic in Maine devised a novel setup based on microfluidic reactors, tiny self-contained laboratories that allow scientists to study the behaviourr of fluids—and in this case, gases as well—on the microscale. Previous reactors attempted to dissolve bubbles in hydrogen gas or CO2 in water, but this failed because volatile hydrogen gas was not allowed to react. Sojo and Hudson had been in talks about the solution. They shared a laboratory bench at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (Saitama), Japan. Hudson’s Maine laboratory was where the final reactor was constructed. Dolly Stewart amended the above on January 19, 2021
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More research shows that cells were able to create a membrane which could contain a complex system of macromolecules replicating. Although it seems complicated, drying-wetting offers an easy solution. When membrane-forming cholesterols are dried with large molecules present, they are placed between two alternating bilayers of lipid. A substantial portion of the molecules are retained within the vesicular membrane structure after rehydration. This allows for the concentration of molecules in dilute solutions. Amphiphilic compounds serve a primary purpose: to create closed microenvironments. If macro molecular catalytic-information system were encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment. This is a first step toward true cell function. Individuals would be created by encapsulation; every cell would differ from its neighbourr.
Sciencedaily.com This is how Museum Gerstner Scholar Victor Sojo, from the College of the Atlantic, Maine, explained the solution. They created a new setup using microfluidic reactors. These tiny, self-contained labs allow scientists to examine the behaviourr of fluids and gases on the microscale. Previous reactors attempted to dissolve bubbles in hydrogen gas or CO2 in water, but this failed because volatile hydrogen gas was able to escape before the had reaction taken place. Sojo and Hudson had been in talks about the problem. They shared a laboratory bench at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (Saitama), Japan. Hudson’s Maine laboratory was where the final reactor was constructed. Bertha Donahue, Ipoh (Malaysia) was the last to make this modification 45 days back.
Mehreen Alberts

Written by Mehreen Alberts

I'm a creative writer who has found the love of writing once more. I've been writing since I was five years old and it's what I want to do for the rest of my life. From topics that are close to my heart to everything else imaginable!

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