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is single subject design quantitative research?


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A type of quantitative research that studies the behaviour of only a few participants, single-subject research involves in depth research. Single-subject research does not necessarily refer to one participant. It can be used to describe a group of participants that includes between 2 and 10. This is why single-subject research is sometimes called small-n. The statistical symbol for the sample size is n. Single-subject research can be contrasted with group research, which typically involves studying large numbers of participants and examining their behaviorprimarily in terms of group means, standard deviations, and so on 🙈 The majority of this textbook is devoted to understanding group research, which is the most common approach in psychology 🙌 But single-subject research is an important alternative, and it is the primary approach in some areas of psychology. [1]
It is helpful to look at some common features before you start looking into specific research designs. In Figure 10.2, you can see many of these characteristics. It shows results from a single subject study. The dependent variable, represented on the graph’s y-axis, is repeatedly measured over time. (Represented by the x-axis), at regular intervals. A second aspect of the study involves the division into separate phases. Each phase tests the participants under one condition. These conditions are usually identified by capitalized letters such as A, B and C. As an example, Figure 10.2 shows a test in which the participant was first tested under one condition (A), followed by another (B), before being retested with the original (A) condition. This is known as a reverse design, and we will discuss it in detail soon. This page was last edited on 47 days ago, by Corday wilder (Guiping, China). [2]
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The issue of data analysis is one area of contention. Group research advocates worry about the inability to visually inspect whether or not treatment affects dependent variables. A particular concern is the inability to detect weak effects through visual inspection. A second is that visual inspection can be unreliable, with different researchers reaching different conclusions about the’s having same set of data (Danov & Symons, 2008). A third is that the results of visual inspection—an overall judgment of whether or not a treatment was effective—cannot be clearly and efficiently summarized or compared across studies (unlike the measures of relationship strength typically used in group research). [3]
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Researchbasics.education.uconn.edu also mentions how “Single subject research (also known as single case experiments) is popular in the fields of special education and counseling. When the researcher wants to alter the behavior of an individual, or small number of people and want to record that change in their behaviours, this research design works well. This design is different from true experiments in which participants are assigned randomly. control and treatment Group, single subject research uses the same participant as the control or treatment group. To show how an intervention or treatment affects the outcome, the researcher employs line graphs. An important factor of single subject research One variable can be changed at any one time. Single subject research designs are “weak when it comes to external validity….Studies involving single-subject designs that show a particular treatment to be effective in changing behaviourr must rely on replication–across individuals rather than groups–if such results are be found worthy of generalization” (Fraenkel & Wallen, 2006, p. 318). Santana Nagel (Bhopal, India), last updated this document 66 days back. [4]
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Researcher Vance Hall and his colleagues were faced with the challenge of increasing the extent to which six disruptive elementary school students stayed focused on their schoolwork (Hall, Lund, & Jackson, 1968). The researchers meticulously recorded each student’s schoolwork for each day, taking note of every 10 seconds over a period of 30 minutes. After establishing a baseline, the researchers developed a treatment. The treatment was that when the student was doing schoolwork, the had teacher given him or her positive attention in the form of a comment like “good work” or a pat on the shoulder. All of these students saw a significant increase in their schoolwork time and decreased disruptive behavior during the treatment phase. For example, a student named Robbie originally spent 25% of his time on schoolwork and the other 75% “snapping rubber bands, playing with toys from his pocket, and talking and laughing with peers” (p. 3). However, during the treatment phase, Robbie had only spent 29% of his time doing other activities and 71% on schoolwork. Finaly, the researcher had access to the teacher. stop giving Students who received positive attention showed a decreased in studying and an increase in disruptive behaviour. The positive attention was the reason for students’ increased study. This was one of the first studies to show that attending to positive behaviourr—and ignoring negative behaviourr—could be a quick and effective way to deal with problem behaviourr in an applied setting. Blain H. on March 13, 2020 modified. [5]
My mentor was Dr. Cynthia Thompson, who was trained by Leija McReynolds from the University of Kansas, which was where a lot of single-subject design in our field originated, and so I was fortunate to be on the cutting edge of this being implemented in our science back in the late ’70s early ’80s. These types of design have experienced a significant increase in attention, which is due to the high quality data available from them. We also saw a rise in popularity of such designs throughout the 1980s through the 1990s as well as the 2000s. But I think — I’ve talked with other single-subject design investigators, and now we’re seeing maybe a little bit of a lapse of attention, and a lack of training again among our young folks. Maybe people assume that people understand the foundation, but they really don’t. Science is facing more difficulties. We need to rebuild the foundations of our young scientists. The project I believe will help us move in this direction. Last edited by Teja Stewart, Jingjiang (China) 95 days ago [6]
Get additional insight from ecampusontario.pressbooks.pub It is also clear that it’s important to think about the commonalities between single-subject research design before you look at specific ones. In Figure 10.2, you can see many of these characteristics. It shows results from a single subject study. The dependent variable, represented on the graph’s y-axis, is repeatedly measured over time. (Represented by the x-axis), at regular intervals. A second aspect of the study involves the division into separate phases. Each phase tests the participants under one condition. These conditions are usually identified by capitalized letters such as A, B and C. As an example, Figure 10.2 shows a test in which participants were first tested under one condition (A), followed by another (B), before being retested with the original (A) condition. The reversal of the design is also known and we will discuss it in detail. [7]

Article references

  1. https://opentextbc.ca/researchmethods/chapter/overview-of-single-subject-research/
  2. https://opentextbc.ca/researchmethods/chapter/single-subject-research-designs/
  3. https://opentextbc.ca/researchmethods/chapter/the-single-subject-versus-group-debate/
  4. https://researchbasics.education.uconn.edu/single-subject-research/
  5. https://saylordotorg.github.io/text_research-methods-in-psychology/s14-single-subject-research.html
  6. https://academy.pubs.asha.org/2014/12/single-subject-experimental-design-an-overview/
  7. https://ecampusontario.pressbooks.pub/researchmethods/chapter/single-subject-research-designs/