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Is Tropical Soda Apple Poisonous? [Resolved]

The Red Soda Apple, Solanum capsicoides, might be a native Floridian 🔥 Botanists can’t agree 😊 It can be found worldwide in the most temperate regions 🙌 S. Capsidoides can be confused with Solanum Aculeastissimum outside of North America. Or… botanists being what they are… S. Aculeastissimum and S. Capsidoides might be the same species, or a close variation. It is large, thorny and can grow up to one yard tall. The spines are all around the plant, including on the leaves which may be shining. Its round, green fruits resemble a watermelon with stripes. The fruit is small and reddish when it’s ripe. It is likely that the fruit will not be eaten as it is potentially toxic. However, there are a few references that suggest the exact opposite. They say that ripe flesh can be eaten, but they are not always correct. Skin nor seeds These have the highest levels of toxic substances. The flesh can only be eaten in very small quantities. The flesh is loaded with steroids and precursors to steroid hormones. It has been used in abortions as well as other harmful effects that steroids have on your body. Cockroach bait had is made from ripe fruit. S. Aculeastissimum, according to some botanists, is African. The rest of the nasty stuff about S. Capsicoides is Brazilian. Avoid this dangerous plant family. Red Soda Apples are not safe to eat. Until someone else can prove otherwise, that is the position I am taking. [1]
Solanum capicoides (the Red Soda Apple), might be native Floridian. Botanists can’t agree. The plant is found now in the most temperate regions of the planet. S. Capsidoides can be confused with Solanum Aculeastissimum outside of North America. Or… botanists being what they are… S. Aculeastissimum and S. Capsidoides might be the same species, or a close variation. It is large, thorny and can grow up to one yard tall. The spines are all around the plant, including on the leaves which may be shining. Its round, green fruits resemble a watermelon with stripes. The fruit is slightly smaller than an ping-pong ball when it’s ripe. It is likely that the fruit will not be eaten as it is potentially toxic. However, there are some hints that the reverse may be true. Most people say that the flesh of the mature fruit is edible, but the skin and seeds containing the most toxic substances are not. The flesh can only be eaten in small quantities. The flesh is loaded with steroids and precursors to steroid hormones. It has been used in abortions as well as other harmful effects that steroids have on your body. Cockroach bait had is made from ripe fruit. Botanists argue that S. Aculeastissimum can be found in Africa and not S. Capsicoides, which is Brazilian. Avoid this dangerous plant family. Red Soda Apples are not safe to eat. Until someone else can prove otherwise, that is the position I am taking. Last revised by Aileen Simons, Louisville, United States. [2]
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One of the most aggressive pests is the tropical soda apple. It can grow monocultures up to 50 acres in Florida. The plant prickles, which can result in impeded wildlife access and a barrier to animal movement within the affected areas, are another way that it affects ecosystems. The tropical soda apple also contains solasodine which can be fatal to people if it is consumed. This invader is also used to provide an alternative route for pathogens, such as potato mosaic virus, Gemini virus, and cucumber mosaic viruses. Leaf roll virusPotato virus Y and tobacco etch virus. [3]
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Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), is an aggressive, prickly, perennial shrub 1–2 m high. You can find it in open and semi-shaded places, including pastures, riparian zones and recreational areas. The plant can also disrupt ecological processes and reduce biodiversity. The foliage of this plant is not suitable for livestock and reduces carrying capacity. However, cattle consume the fruits, spreading viable seeds in manure. These are the thorny thickets. Plant create a physical barrier for animals preventing access to shade and water. The plant is a host for many diseases and pests of cultivated cropsIt contains solasodine, which can be fatal to people. Demetric Milligan, January 19, 2020. [4]
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Lakenya Johnson at invasive.orgThe article mentions three species that are not native to the genus Solanum and which can be considered to be invasive weeds in natural and agricultural areas of Florida (Langeland & Burks 1998). The problem of tropical soda apple Solanumviarum Dunal is much more widespread than that of Solanum Tampicense Dunal and turkey berry Solanum Torvum Swartz. This is because the plant has spread rapidly across the United States since its establishment in Florida (Westbrooks 1998). The introduction of tropical soda apple and wetland nightshade in Florida was relatively recent. Turkey berry, although introduced in Florida nearly a century back, was only recognized recently as an invasive species (Langeland-Burks 1998). [5]
Roger Baron, forestry.alabama.govIdentification: This perennial shrub grows from 3 to 6 feet tall and can be upright or leaning. The leaves are covered in velvety hair, with broad-based yellow to white thorns. The leaves are similar to the northern red oak’s and have a deep lobed, alternate pattern, measuring 4-8 inches in length and 2-6 inches in width. Dark green leaves have whitish midveins, and lighter greens with netted veins. Alabama’s flowers bloom from May to August with small terminal clusters made up of five-petaled white flowers, and yellow or white fused stamens that project from the center. Flowers produce 1 to 1.5 inch wide, whitish-mottled, spherical fruits that mature to yellow between June and November. The fruit stays green in most places south, though, even after the cold season. The sweet-smelling but toxic fruit may produce between 200 and 400 reddish brown seeds. A tropical soda apple looks like horsenettle, Solanum carolinense. Last modified by Olive Workman, Barquisimeto (Venezuela) on August 8, 2018. [6]

Refer to the Article

  1. http://www.eattheweeds.com/tag/tropical-soda-apple/
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/tag/solanum-viarum/
  3. http://www.tsusinvasives.org/home/database/solanum-viarum
  4. https://weeds.dpi.nsw.gov.au/Weeds/Details/186
  5. https://www.invasive.org/biocontrol/23sodaapple.html
  6. https://forestry.alabama.gov/Pages/Informational/Invasive/Tropical_Soda_Apple.aspx
Mae Chow

Written by Mae Chow

Passionate about writing and studying Chinese, I blog about anything from fashion to food. And of course, study chinese! I'm a passionate blogger and life enthusiast who loves to share my thoughts, views and opinions with the world. I share things that are close to my heart as well as topics from all over the world.

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