What Antibiotics Cause Neuropathy? (SOLVED!)

Design, Setting and Participants. This case-control study used anonymous data from patients who were routinely registered in general practices of The Health Improvement Network, which is a vast primary care database that covers the United Kingdom from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2015, as well as anonymized patient data. The data analysis was conducted on January 8, 2018. The cohort consisted of 1 338 900 adults issued 1 or more prescriptions of fluoroquinolone (34.3%) or amoxicillin-clavulanate (65.7%) antibiotics. By using incidence density sampling, adults with incident peripheral nervepathy were matched (based on age, gender, and time) 🙌 Selected from a cohort prescribed oral fluoroquinolone or amoxicillin-clavulanate antibiotics 😁 Incidence rate ratios of peripheral neuropathy were calculated for fluoroquinolone and for amoxicillin-clavulanate exposure and compared with nonexposure among Patients without diabetes and sensitivity analyzes to verify the consistency of results. Population mean–adjusted rate differences were then estimated, including the number needed to harm for various durations of fluoroquinolone therapy. [1]
The milder, more than motor distal peripheral neuropathy caused by chloroquine is rare. Due to both axonal damage to desmyelination (84, 89, 77). One case of paraesthesias due to antiparasitic medication mefloquine has been reported (60). Neuropathy usually develops after a few years. A high level of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein may lead to confusion with Chronic inflammatory demyelinating Polyneuropathy (89 and 21). Vacuolar myopathy is the most serious neuromuscular problem (19). A few cases have also been reported of hearing loss or retinopathy due to chloroquine. There is marked improvement after discontinuing the use of this drug (19; 43). Neuromuscular toxicities from the short-term administration of hydroxychloroquine, or an agent against COVID19 are speculative. [2]
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Design, Setting and Participants. This case-control study used anonymous data from patients who were routinely registered in general practices of The Health Improvement Network, which is a vast primary care database that covers the United Kingdom from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2015, as well as anonymized patient data. The data analysis was conducted on January 8, 2018. The cohort consisted of 1 338 900 adults issued 1 or more prescriptions of fluoroquinolone (34.3%) or amoxicillin-clavulanate (65.7%) antibiotics. Adults with incident peripheral neuropathy were matched (on age, sex, general practise, and calendar time) with up to 4 controls by using incidence density sampling selected from a cohort prescribed oral fluoroquinolone or amoxicillin-clavulanate antibiotics. Incidence rate ratios of peripheral neuropathy were calculated for fluoroquinolone and for amoxicillin-clavulanate exposure and compared with nonexposure among patients without diabetes, with sensitivity anlyzes testing the consistency of the results. Population mean–adjusted rate differences were then estimated, including the number needed to harm for various durations of fluoroquinolone therapy. [3]
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Lesley Paz at brainandlife.org Please contact us for more information. While most of the side effects of fluoroquinolone have been short-term, many cases of serious and persistent peripheral neuropathies have been reported. Some symptoms include tingling, numbness and “electrical” sensations; shooting and burning pain with night-onset; hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli; and symptoms related to musculoskeletal discomfort. The symptoms could last for up to two weeks. Patients also reported experiencing functional limitations like impaired mobility and tendinitis. Although no conclusive research has been done to prove that fluoroquinolones cause neuropathy in patients, there have been reports of symptoms being completely resolved after stopping fluoroquinolone medication. Credit to Nicolai Bloom for the most recent insight. [4]
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Article references

  1. https://neurosciencenews.com/antibiotics-nerve-damage-13083/
  2. https://www.medlink.com/articles/antibiotic-induced-neuropathy
  3. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2731583
  4. https://www.brainandlife.org/articles/can-certain-antibiotics-specifically-fluoroquinolones-cause-neuropathic-pain/
Mehreen Alberts

Written by Mehreen Alberts

I'm a creative writer who has found the love of writing once more. I've been writing since I was five years old and it's what I want to do for the rest of my life. From topics that are close to my heart to everything else imaginable!

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