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What Are The Primary Male Reproductive Organs? (#1 Answer)

The vas deferens and epididymis, which are responsible for transporting sperm, also accompany the testicles. The epididymis (pronounced: ep-uh-DID-uh-miss) and the testicles hang in a pouch-like structure outside the pelvis called the scrotum 👍 This bag of skin helps to regulate the temperature of testicles, which need to be kept cooler than body temperature to produce sperm 🙌 The scrotum changes size to maintain the right temperature. As the body becomes colder, the scrotum contracts and is unable to retain body heat. It expands and becomes floppy to remove heat when it is warm. All of this happens naturally, without any thought from a male. It is the brain and nervous system that give the signal to the scrotum to increase in size. [1]
The epididymis (ep-uh-DID-uh) and vas deferens are also responsible for transporting sperm. The pouch-shaped structure called the scrotum that houses the epididymis and testicles is located outside the pelvis, known as the epuhdID-uhh-miss. The scrotum is a bag made of skin that regulates the testicles’ temperature. Sperm must be produced at a lower temperature than their body. In order to keep the temperature at the ideal level, the size of your scrotum will change. The scrotum contracts to retain body heat when it is cold. It expands and becomes floppy to remove heat when it is warm. All of this happens naturally, without any thought from a male. The brain and nervous systems give the signals to the scrotum that it is time for a change in size. Whitnee Vegas was the one who revised this article. [2]
Image #2
The epididymis (ep-uh-DID-uh) and vas deferens are also responsible for transporting sperm. The pouch-like structure called the scrotum that surrounds the pelvis houses the epididymis and the testicles. The scrotum is a bag made of skin that regulates the testicles’ temperature. Sperm must be produced at a lower temperature than their body. In order to keep the temperature at the ideal level, the size of your scrotum will change. The scrotum contracts to retain body heat when it is cold. It expands and becomes floppier when it is warm. All of this happens naturally, without any thought from a male. It is the brain and nervous system that give the signal to the scrotum to increase or decrease in size. Lovie Barth, Taizhou Zhejiang in China (last revision 51 days ago) [3]
Image #3
The primary male reproductive organ is the testes. They are responsible to testosterone and sperm generation. The testis measures 4-5 cm in length, 2-5cm in width, and 10-14g in weight. It is held in the scrotum with the dartos muscle and spermatic cord. Tunica vaginalis and tunica albuginea covers each testis. The lower part of the process vaginalis, the tunica vaginalis (or testis), is reflective from the testes at the inner surface. This creates the parietal and visceral layers. Below the visceral tunica vaginalis layer is the tunica albutea which provides a dense cover for the testes. [4]
Image #4
Ejaculation can be described as the release of semen by contractions. It is an automatic reflex, meaning it does not need to be controlled. This reflex action causes the bladder to close. The result is that semen and urine are not released together. In a normal ejaculation, the volume of semen is 2.5-5 milliliters (mL). Each mL contains more than 20,000,000 sperm. The penis of a male sexually intercourse enters the vagina and carries the sperm into the cervical area (cervix). This is to fertilize the egg of the woman. Kasandra Neely, August 16, 2021. [5]
The male gonads, or testes, are located below the penis in a pouch called the scrotum. They measure 4-5 cm in length and 2.5 cm wide. The tunica arbuginea, tunica vaginalis, are the membranous layers covering them. Sperm is produced by the testes, also called male sex cells and hormones testosterone. Each testis has many lobules that produce sperm. First structures known as seminiferous tubels produce stem cells. These cells are called spermatogonia and divide into spermatocytes. Then, they divide again to form spermatids. Spermatogenesis is the name of this process. The spermatids are able to move from the testis into the epididymis, and then mature into sperm. This was revised by Jeremy Bailey (Miluo, China) April 11, 2021. [6]

Article references

  1. https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/male-repro.html
  2. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/male-reproductive.html
  3. https://kidshealth.org/PrimaryChildrens/en/parents/male-reproductive.html
  4. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1899075-overview
  5. https://patient.info/news-and-features/the-male-reproductive-system
  6. https://www.visiblebody.com/learn/reproductive/male-reproductive-structures
Kelly-Anne Kidston

Written by Kelly-Anne Kidston

I am a writer of many words, from fiction to poetry to reviews. I am an avid reader and a lover of good books. I am currently writing my first novel and would love to find some beta readers who are interested in getting an early look.

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