[SOLVED!] What Is Rflp In Dna Fingerprinting?

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Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a technique that exploits variations in DNA sequences 🙈 DNA from differing sources will have variations or polymorphisms throughout the sequence 🙈 Using Restriction Enzymes, these differences in sequences may be teased out. However, if one were to take the entirety of the human genome and chop it up with a restriction enzyme, many indecipherable fragments would be made. In fact, the resulting agarose gel would simply show a large smear of DNA. RFLP analysis requires that a probe to a specific area of DNA be used to identify specific locations. Agarose gels would be transferred to a membrane or filter where they would be hybridized to these radioactive probes. [1]
When I first started college that’s when DNA fingerprinting started entering the popular knowledge base and people were talking of this DNA technology that could be used to identify people and was considered almost a magical thing. In fact a friend of mine who is an English major he was very confident that he had known exactly what DNA fingerprinting was. I remember him explaining to somebody else it was if you left a fingerprint a Scientist could pick up a bit of your fingerprint put it into a pitridish and grow an entire new copy of you and then look at your clone’s face and identify you that way. (a big thank you to Terrall McMahan from Culiacan, Mexico after pointing this out). [2]
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Based on further reading from genome.gov, rFLPs have been very useful to use as markers for following a genomic DNA, either from human or other animals. What is it, though? So basically, if you follow the sequence of DNA, particular sites, a series of four to eight nucleic acids, results in a restriction site where an enzyme from bacteria can actually bind and cleave that DNA. So why is that useful? Well, we can take advantage of this fact to actually look for differences between people if they have that restriction enzyme site or not. So a single base difference between two people could result in either the presence or absence of that restriction site. So then, if you isolate that piece of DNA surrounding that site from two people, from one of them it will be cut by the enzyme and the other one it had won’t. And that results in a polymorphism, or difference between those two people. We typically see these, or we monitor these, by isolating the DNA, cutting it with that bacterial restriction enzyme, and running it on a gel using electrophoresis. In one person, without the enzyme site you’ll see one band, and the person that has the enzyme site, you’ll see two bands, representing the two cleaved products. So these differences in nucleic acid sequences and restriction enzyme binding sites just mean that there’s a difference in the sequence between those two people. That sequence difference doesn’t necessarily mean that there’s a disease associated with it. It’s a polymorphism that we could use to follow the inheritance of DNA. (last modified 23 days ago by Latoia Phipps from Sulaimaniya, Iraq) [3]
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A recent analysis indicates restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a technique that exploits variations in DNA sequences. DNA from differing sources will have variations or polymorphisms throughout the sequence. Using Restriction Enzymes, these differences in sequences may be teased out. However, if one were to take the entirety of the human genome and chop it up with a restriction enzyme, many indecipherable fragments would be made. In fact, the resulting agarose gel would simply show a large smear of DNA. RFLP analysis requires that a probe to a specific area of DNA be used to identify specific locations. Agarose gels would be transferred to a membrane or filter where they would be hybridized to these radioactive probes. (last edited 39 days ago by Dede McManus from Cagayan De Oro City, Philippines) [4]
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Article References

  1. https://bio.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Biotechnology/Bio-OER_(CUNY)/08:_Analyzing_DNA/8.06:_DNA_Fingerprinting_(RFLP)
  2. https://www.brightstorm.com/science/biology/molecular-biology/rflp-dna-fingerprinting/
  3. https://www.genome.gov/genetics-glossary/Restriction-Fragment-Length-Polymorphism
  4. https://openlab.citytech.cuny.edu/bio-oer/analyzing-dna/rflp-analysis/
Mae Chow

Written by Mae Chow

Passionate about writing and studying Chinese, I blog about anything from fashion to food. And of course, study chinese! I'm a passionate blogger and life enthusiast who loves to share my thoughts, views and opinions with the world. I share things that are close to my heart as well as topics from all over the world.

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