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[RESOLVED!] What Is The Significance Of The Hopwood V Texas Court Decision?

The Fifth Circuit panel decision held that diversity in itself is not a compelling justification for the use of racial preferences 😁 Judge Smith’s opinion recognized that nowhere in Supreme Court history had a majority of justices reasoned that diversity was worthy of constitutional protection 🤓 The Supreme Court had said that racial preference was only justified to correct past wrongs when it upheld them 😉 University of Texas could not point to past discrimination it was trying to rectify with its racial preference programme. In reality, however, the university acknowledged that Mexican Americans, who were considered to be a favourite minority under its racial preferences programme, had not been subject to discrimination in their past. [1]
Applications from the middle category were the subject of the greatest scrutiny. All other applicants than Mexican Americans and blacks were examined. Files were put into 30 stacks, which were distributed to three full members of admissions committees. In reviewing each file, each subcommittee member could cast one vote. This was usually between nine and eleven. A candidate could receive between two and three votes. The chairman can veto this so that he is allowed to offer him a job. If the candidate gets one vote, the applicant will be placed on the wait list. Those with none votes are denied admission. Starlynn Downey (Sharjah, United Arab Emirates), for providing the heads-up [2]
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Magdalena Crews law.jrank.orgThe Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was both celebrated and decried for its decision on affirmative action. Hopwood and three other people had sued University of Texas for being refused admission to its 1992 law school. They charged the institution with “reverse discrimination”–passing them over for admission in favourr of minorities with lower test scores and grades. Though affirmative actions critics had long fought for an end of “race-based preference” systems, Hopwood was an affirmation that the University of Texas Law School policy they used violated an important 1978 Supreme Court decision on affirmative. Julia Thomas, Jalandhar (India) edited this document on March 9, 2020. [3]
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Based on an Article from idra.org, editor’s Note: The U.S. Supreme Court recently let stand a Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling in a case that challenged the legality of the University of Texas’ admissions procedures related to the use of race as a basis for its law school admissions. The Supreme Court ruled that Hopwood et al had not been reviewed because the had school had changed its policies. Al. Vs. State of Texas Al. Al. Open the door Future considerations of challenges to current practices will be taken into account. Albert Kauffman, senior litigator for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF), presents a summary of the major findings in the Fifth Circuit’s Hopwood decision, summarizing what the ruling holds (says), what it does not hold and some related issues in “the rest of the story.” A statement on the implications of the case and the Supreme Court’s action follows. (We are truly grateful to Bren from Taixing in China for his kind words). [4]
According to the experts at law.jrank.orgJust three months later, Texas State Attorney General Dan Morales stated that the decision of the Hopwood court should apply to all Texas schools and not only the University of Texas Law School. Norma Cantu from the U.S. Department of Education was quick to respond. Cantu said that the had case done not apply to University of Texas Law School’s admissions policies and that federal funding for the University of Texas could drop to as much as $500 million if the school rescinds its affirmative-action practices in financial aid and undergraduate admissions. Stephen Long, Frankfurt, Germany (November 22, 2020). [5]

References to Articles

  1. https://www.cir-usa.org/cases/hopwood-v-texas/
  2. https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F3/78/932/504514/
  3. https://law.jrank.org/pages/24219/Hopwood-v-Texas-Significance.html
  4. https://www.idra.org/resource-center/the-hopwood-case/
  5. https://law.jrank.org/pages/24226/Hopwood-v-Texas-An-End-Affirmative-Action.html
Mae Chow

Written by Mae Chow

Passionate about writing and studying Chinese, I blog about anything from fashion to food. And of course, study chinese! I'm a passionate blogger and life enthusiast who loves to share my thoughts, views and opinions with the world. I share things that are close to my heart as well as topics from all over the world.

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