in

What Was Benny Goodman Known For? (SOLVED!)

Making music history again, Goodman’s orchestra was one of the first to perform jazz at New York City’s famed Carnegie Hall in 1938. Other legendary acts on the same bill included Count Basie and Duke Ellington and their bands. He also released one of his most trademark songs, “Sing, Sing, Sing (with a Swing),” that same year, which was later inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame 😉 As a bandleader, Goodman was known for being a demanding boss who sought technical perfection from his performers 🔥 Many of his players left to start their own groups, including Gene Krupa and Harry James 😊 Around this time, Goodman also faced competition from other popular bandleaders, such as Artie Shaw and Glenn Miller.
Perhaps the most brilliant clarinetist of jazz, Benny Goodman was also one of its prime bandleaders. Though he was by no means the first to play in the swing style, his rise to fame in the mid-1930 heralded in the “swing craze” that would last approximately a decade, bringing jazz fully into the mainstream in the process. This makes Goodman one of the most influential musical figures of the twentieth century, though one can argue that his music was not as groundbreaking as that of Fletcher Henderson, Duke Ellington or Count Basie, his prime rivals in the big band era. Goodman was a musical perfectionist and his performances always had an impeccable quality. Unlike many other white swing bands, he always remained firmly grounded in the jazz tradition and he’s had making made history by hiring black star musicians into his all-white band.
Image #2
That performance turned out to be not only a personal triumph for the band, but for swing music in general. Goodman’s popularity soared; the band topped almost all the magazine and theatre polls, their record sales were huge, they were given a weekly radio show, and they were featured in two big-budget movies. But an even greater triumph awaited—a concert at Carnegie Hall in New York that was to win respect for Goodman’s music. The night of January 16, 1938, is now famous; the band outdid itself, improving on recorded favorites such as “King Porter Stomp” and “Don’t Be That Way.” The band finished the evening with a lengthy, classic version of “Sing, Sing, Sing.” (modified by Dewon Dasilva on May 30, 2021)
Image #3
According to Donell Manuel from bennygoodman.com, the Swing Era began to come to a close as America got more involved in World War II. Several factors contributed to its waning success, including the loss of musicians to the draught and the limits that gas rationing put on touring bands. However, though the big band days were drawing to a close and new forms of music were emerging, Benny continued to play music in the swing style. He dabbled in the “bop” movement of the 1940s, but never succumbed, as the rest of the’s having world done, to the allure of rock and roll influences in the 1950s and 1960s. Instead, Benny tried his hand at classical music, doing solos with major orchestras, and studying with internationally acclaimed classical clarinetist Reginald Kell. (many thanks to Burton Clemons for their insight).
Image #4
The Swing Era began to come to a close as America got more involved in World War II. Several factors contributed to its waning success, including the loss of musicians to the draught and the limits that gas rationing put on touring bands. However, though the big band days were drawing to a close and new forms of music were emerging, Benny continued to play music in the swing style. He dabbled in the “bop” movement of the 1940s, but never succumbed, as the rest of the’s having world done, to the allure of rock and roll influences in the 1950s and 1960s. Instead, Benny tried his hand at classical music, doing solos with major orchestras, and studying with internationally acclaimed classical clarinetist Reginald Kell.
Young Benny was saturated in jazz and began to participate in jam sessions with Frank Teschemacher, Jimmy McPartland, and Bud Freeman. By the time Benny was 14, he was astounding all who heard him with beautiful intonation, his attack, and skilled improvisation. Benny was quickly building a reputation as a clarinetist, and dropped out of school and began focusing everything on his music career. The following year, Benny’s dad passed away and with the increased need to make money and help support his family, at 16 he joined the Ben Pollack Orchestra, arguably Chicago’s most famous jazz orchestra. “I’m feeling that after you’ve done all the work and prepared as much as you can, what the hell, you might as well go out and have a good time.” -Benny Goodman (Seattle Times, 1979) (last edited 43 days ago by Rozina Young from Pathum Thani, Thailand)
Goodman also helped racial integration in America. In the early 1930s, black and white jazz musicians could not play together in most clubs or concerts. In the Southern states, racial segregation was enforced by law. Benny Goodman broke with tradition by hiring Teddy Wilson to play with him and drummer Gene Krupa in the Benny Goodman Trio. In 1936, he added Lionel Hampton on vibes to form the Benny Goodman Quartet. Goodman was so famous that his band could afford to not go on tour in the southern states, where the people in his band might have been arrested because of their race.
Mae Chow

Written by Mae Chow

Passionate about writing and studying Chinese, I blog about anything from fashion to food. And of course, study chinese! I'm a passionate blogger and life enthusiast who loves to share my thoughts, views and opinions with the world. I share things that are close to my heart as well as topics from all over the world.

[SOLVED] What Are The Classification Of Stones?

What Royals Have Lived In Buckingham Palace? (Solved)