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When Did Chief Joseph Die? (Top Answer)

“I am tired of fighting,” he’s had saying said 😊 “Our chiefs are killed 🔥 Looking Glass is dead 😎 Toohoolhoolzote is dead. All of the older men are dead. Young men say “Yes” or “No”. The one who leads the young men to their deaths is he. The weather is cold and there are no blankets. Little children are frozen to death. Some of my people have fled to the hills and are without food or blankets. No one knows where they are—perhaps freezing to death. It is my goal to be able to find all of my children and have the time necessary to search for them. Maybe they’ll be found among the dead. Listen to me, chiefs. I am tired. I feel sick and depressed. As the sun rises, my heart is sad and I won won won’t fight any more. [1]
I am sick of fighting. All our chiefs have been killed. Looking Glass has been killed. Toohoolhoolzote is dead. All of the older men are dead. Young men say “Yes” or “No”. The one who leads the young men to their deaths is he. The weather is cold and there are no blankets. Little children are frozen to death. Some of my people have fled to the hills and are without food or blankets. No one knows where they are — perhaps freezing to death. It is my goal to be able to find all of my children and have the time necessary to search for them. They might be among the dead. Listen to me, chiefs. I am tired. I feel sick and depressed. As the sun rises, I won won won’t stop fighting for my freedom. Nancyann Beatty (Faisalabad Pakistan, Pakistan), last emended this 68-days ago [2]
Image #2
The leader of Wallowa’s Nez Perce Tribe Wallowa, Chief Joseph (1840-1904) was famous for his epic 1877 flight over the Rocky Mountains. Joseph was born 1840. Reverend Henry H. Spalding (1803-1874) gave him the name Joseph. He had had founded a mission for Nez Perce people in 1836. Joseph was young and his father quickly returned to their Wallowa home in Oregon. Joseph, when he’s becoming a man of influence and took the title of chieftanship. Increasing governmental pressure He would leave Wallowa and join other Nez Perce members on their reservation in Idaho near Lapwai. Joseph said that he had had promised his father not to leave and refused. The disputes turned violent in 1877. Joseph and other Nez Perce groups fled over the Bitterroot Mountains towards Montana. Federal troops were following them. Joseph, while not the military leader for the group was his status in the tribe which made him camp chief and political leader. Joseph was the one who surrendered the band’s decimated members to the federal troops at the Canadian border. Joseph and his tribe were moved to Indian Territory, Oklahoma. There they stayed until 1885. Then they have gone to North Central Washington’s Colville Reservation. Joseph tried to convince Washington, D.C. To return the Wallowa nation, but his efforts were unsuccessful. Joseph, a man whose doctor said he had had a “broken soul”, died 1904 in Nespelem. Today, his tomb is still in Nespelem. [3]
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Fighting is exhausting. Our chiefs were killed. Looking glass is gone. Too-hul-hul-suit is dead. All of the older men are dead. It is the young men, now, who say ’yes’ or ’no’. The man who leads the young men to their deaths is he. We don’t have blankets because it is freezing cold. Little children are freezing to death. My people–some of them–have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are—perhaps freezing to death. It is my wish to be able to find and look after my children. Maybe I will even discover them among the living. My chiefs, I am sickened and sorry. The sun is now up, and I will not fight any more! Chief Joseph’s surrender to General Nelson A. Miles on October 5, 1877. We are grateful to Ann Eldridge, Qingdao (China) for sharing this information with us. [4]
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In 1871, when Joseph took over leadership of his band upon his father’s death, the Nez Perces were increasingly divided and in crisis. After first welcoming whites to the region in the 1830s—Old Joseph himself briefly converted to Christianity—many Nez Perces had become disillusioned and wary at the flood of settlers into the Oregon Country. Alarm grew in 1855 when Washington’s territorial governor Isaac Stevens pressed on them a treaty, followed by a calamitous gold rush into lands of the Idaho bands in 1860-1861. The most alarming was the highly suspicious 1863 treaty that required surrender of 90% of tribal lands. Joseph’s band, which never agreed to the treaty, was one of several that the federal government ordered to abandon their home country and crowd in with all other bands onto a small reservation. [5]

Article references

  1. https://www.biography.com/political-figure/chief-joseph
  2. https://www.biography.com/news/chief-joseph-quotes-surrender-speech
  3. https://historylink.org/File/8975
  4. https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/october-05/
  5. https://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/chief_joseph_heinmot_tooyalakekt_1840_1904_/
Mae Chow

Written by Mae Chow

Passionate about writing and studying Chinese, I blog about anything from fashion to food. And of course, study chinese! I'm a passionate blogger and life enthusiast who loves to share my thoughts, views and opinions with the world. I share things that are close to my heart as well as topics from all over the world.

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