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Why Is Rhyolite Red? [Solved]

Many gem deposits are hosted in rhyolite 🤓 These occur for a logical reason 🤓 The thick granitic lava that forms rhyolite often cools quickly while pockets of gas are still trapped inside of the lava. When the lava cools quickly, trapped gas cannot escape. This creates cavities called “vugs” The vugs can later be formed when the lava flows have cooled down and groundwater or hydrothermal gas has moved through. These are the best places to find red beryl and jasper. Gem-hunters have learned from this, and are continually on the lookout to find vuggy rhyolite. [1]
Rhyolite Germany: This Thuringian Forest is mainly composed of Rhyolites, Latites, and Pyrolastic Rocks of the Rotliegendes. Saxony and especially its north-west. Saxony Anhalt north of Halle. Saar-Nahe Basin e.g. The Königstuhl (Pfalz) on the Donnersberg mountain. Black Forest, e.g. The Karlsruher Grat. Odenwald. America. Rhyolite. Andes. Cascade Range. Cobalt, Ontario Canada. Rocky Mountains. Jemez Mountains. Nevada’s Rhyolite was given its name after the rhyolite deposits that characterized this area. St. Francois Mountains. Jasper Beach – Machiasport, Maine. Oceania Rhyolite A large number of young rhyolite volcanic volcanoes can be found in New Zealand’s Taupo Volcanic Zone. Gondwana Rainforests in Australia World Heritage Area is home to rhyolite restricted flora that runs along the Great Dividing Range. Cilia Quintana (Port Harcourt, Nigeria), last revised this 26-days ago [2]
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Rhyolite, a felsic extrusive stone is called. Rhyolite lava has a high level of silica. This makes it very viscous. It is very slow and flows like toothpaste. As it builds up, it forms lava domes. When rhyolite is rich in gas, it may explode explosively. This can form a thick, solidified, foamy magma known as pumice. It’s a light, translucent, non-vesicular, lightweight version of rhyolite, along with ash and/or ignimbrite. Sometimes, extremely porous Rhyolite flows can form. These flows are extremely porous and can be degassed, then collapsed to form obsidian. Obsidian is dark-coloured volcanic glass. Rhyolite, the volcanic counterpart of granite. Group – volcanic. Color – Variable, but very light. Texture – Usually porphyritic. However, it can be aphanitic. Obsidian). The mineral content of groundmass is generally quartz and plagioclase with less orthoclase or biotite. Silica (SiO 2) content – 69%-77%. Can be used for aggregate and fill. It is often not recommended for use in the road and construction industries. concrete aggregate Because of its high silica contents, obsidian can be used to cut jewelrypumice. It can also be used in light-weight building materials and as an abrasive. New Zealand’s most notable occurrences include Northland and Great Barrier Island. Coromandel Peninsula, Bay of Plenty. Rotorua Taupo is an area in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. There are also minor occurrences at Banks Peninsula. Modified by Tyler Baker, Bhiwandi (India), December 28, 2021 [3]
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Endogenous and exogenous lava dome: Lava domes can vary in their size and shape depending on how volatile the lava is and the rheology. The way they grow can also be affected (Fig. Some domes form by the formation of new lobes from lava that have been extruded at summit vents. As well as covering the top of the dome, such lobes may ooze down the steeper flanks, forming coulées (French: lava flow) whose surfaces are pleated by distinctive arcuate ridges, called ogives, resembling large scale pahoehoe. Exogenous refers to dome growth that is extrusive. Latin: Growing on the outside. However, many lava domes are formed by inflation when new magma enters the interior of the dome without bursting out at the surface. Endogenous dome growth, which is Latin for “growing from within”, can lead to blocky or spiny tops as well steep sides that are covered in talus from the steepened slopes. Exogenous or endogenous, lava domes can be formed. This is something Marlana Slater, Ankara Turkey, has highlighted. [4]
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Refer to the Article

  1. https://geology.com/rocks/rhyolite.shtml
  2. https://geologyscience.com/rocks/igneous-rocks/rhyolite/
  3. https://flexiblelearning.auckland.ac.nz/rocks_minerals/rocks/rhyolite.html
  4. https://www.alexstrekeisen.it/english/vulc/rhyolite.php
Mehreen Alberts

Written by Mehreen Alberts

I'm a creative writer who has found the love of writing once more. I've been writing since I was five years old and it's what I want to do for the rest of my life. From topics that are close to my heart to everything else imaginable!

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